09 Jan Letpadaung committee rejects Suu Kyi’s remark on protest

Written by Soe Than Linn Published in Latpadaung Read 3113 times
Suu-Kyi-at-Letpadaung
 Myanmar opposition leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyi (L) speaks with local people during her visit to a village near the Chinese-backed copper mine project, in Monywa, Myanmar on March 14, 2013. Photo: Soe Than Win/AFP

Nay Pyi Taw – The Committee for the Implementation of the Letpadaung Report has rejected Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s accusation that violence flared up at the Chinese company-run copper mine because the working committee did not implement the suggestions of her investigative body.

U Tin Myint, secretary of the committee, told media January 8 that his committee rejected the claim and is seriously working on the suggestions of the commission. He alleged that recent violence involving local people happened as a result of instigation by outside forces.

Recent clashes between protesters and police at the controversial mine site resulted in the death of one protester and injury to others. Local farmers claim the mining company is stealing and fencing off their land.

Speaking in a press conference at the President’s Office, U Tin Myint said the committee was working on the suggestions of the investigation commission to the best of their ability.

He called for the parties concerned to discuss the controversial project without resorting to violence.

U Tin Myint was a member of the investigation commission on the Letpadaung copper mine project chaired by Daw Aung San Suu Kyi. The commission made a total of 42 suggestions on the issues of land utilization, environmental conservation, and socio-economic and religious concerns.

The commission was set up in the wake of a violent crackdown on protesters in November 2012.

The annual report published by the implementation committee said that 29 suggestions had been implemented, and the remaining 13 are in progress.

“We are giving out compensation for land [used for the project], as we are modifying the draft report of ESIA [Environmental and Social Impact Assessment],” he said.

Last modified on Friday, 09 January 2015 13:20