09 Jan MJN condemns killings at French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo

Written by Min Min Published in Media Read 3088 times
Armed gunmen face police officers near the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, during an attack on the offices of the newspaper which left 12 dead, including two police officers. Photo: Anne Gelbard/AFP
Armed gunmen face police officers near the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, during an attack on the offices of the newspaper which left 12 dead, including two police officers. Photo: Anne Gelbard/AFP

The Yangon-based Myanmar Journalists Network has condemned the terrorist attack against the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris, saying the attack represents a threat against media freedom.

Two masked gunmen shot dead 12 people including Charlie Hebdo magazine’s chief editor, Mr Stephane Charbonnier, four other cartoonists and two police officers and wounded 11 others in the January 7 attack, according to media reports. French President Francois Hollande called it a “terrorist attack of the most extreme barbarity.”

The statement issued by MJN on January 8 expresses sadness over the death of the 10 French journalists and their condolences to their families.

The MJN statement says committing violence against a media organization and killing media people due to the content of the media are direct threats against media freedom.

According to media reports, the January 7 attack involved two gunmen and a driver. Although the reason for the attack has yet to be confirmed, it thought to be in retaliation for the magazine’s series of controversial cartoons depicting Islam’s Prophet Muhammad. The gunmen reportedly shouted “Allahu akbar” and “the Prophet is avenged” during the attack. The police say the suspects are brothers Said Kouachi and Cherif Kouachi, both French, and Hamyd Mourad, 18, whose nationality is unknown. A large scale police and military operation is currently underway in search of the suspects.

The day after the attack, the remaining staff at the magazine announced that the publication would continue, with the next issue to have a print run of 1 million copies, up from its normal 60,000, according to media reports.

Several Asian governments including South Korea, the Philippines, Malaysia, and Thailand have joined in what is viewed as worldwide condemnation of the attack.