Written by Published in Ed/Op

The philosophy of patriotism is not foreign to the people of Myanmar. They want to see their nation grow and prosper. They strive for peace where there is discord and forge fruitful global relationships. They work hard to advance their goals and those of their kinsmen. Myanmar journalists share this sense of patriotism, but their loyalty to their country courses through a much more complicated vein.  

Written by Published in Ed/Op

For the past three decades, Myanmar’s educational system has been locked in a state of desperate insecurity. With each shift of the governmental framework, policies on education follow suit. With each election of a new Minister of Education come new and usually unwelcome changes.Even while the government enjoys a moment of precarious stability, attitudes towards education are constantly shifting, never settling on a definite plan, tactic or ideology. The language of educational policies is uneven, the balance of programming is skewed, and the mixed attitudes of past authorities have muddled into a profound sense ofhopeless uncertainty towards the future of education in Myanmar.

Written by Published in Ed/Op

Editorial - It is natural that people are feeling frightened, suspicious and insecure after nine bomb blasts – and the discovery of other unexploded bombs – in major cities over the past week. Clearly, the spate of bombings was intended to create chaos and unrest during a time when the people of Myanmar are wrestling with the historic transition to a democratic and economically vibrant nation. We should not let those behind these blasts distract us from our goals.

Written by Published in Ed/Op

The news sounds encouraging. The newly-formed Land Utilization Management Central Committee led by Vice President Nyan Tun has vowed to settle all complaints of seized land so far reported to the committee within the space of a year.

Written by Published in Ed/Op

Do people really listen and act on the wise words of elders in society? This is a question that could be rightly asked in the wake of a visit by three eminent members of a group called The Elders that tries to use the wisdom of their age and status to make the world a better place.

Written by Published in Ed/Op

An official from the ruling party recently proclaimed that the current constitution does not now need to be amended. At the same time, ethnic groups are saying that what is needed is an entirely new constitution. Meanwhile, NLD chairperson Aung San Suu Kyi is insistent in her appeals to push through amendments to the existing document through the parliamentary process.